Who we are

The Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society (CAERS) was formed in 1984 to address the need for anti-racist advocacy, education, training and research. To raise public awareness of the danger of racism and hate crime, CAERS organizes conferences, workshops and meetings and helps groups organize across Canada.

CAERS has received numerous awards for this work, including the BC Eliminates Racism Together Award from the Ministry of Multiculturalism for research, an award from the Ministry of Multiculturalism and Immigration for organizing provincial consultations for the United Nations World Conference Against Racism. The Minister Responsible for Multiculturalism had this to say:

"The Ministry of Multiculturalism and Immigration greatly acknowledges the important contribution to the United to Combat Racism: Equality-Dignity-Justice by the Canadian Anti-racism Education and Research Society. Your input, collaboration and leadership made this initiative [WCAR consultations] a success and effectively demonstrated the benefits when government and non-governmental organizations work together to build a society that is free from racism."

As part of that effort CAERS was a delegate of the government of Canada to the European Union preparatory conference for the WCAR and a delegate to the WCAR held in Durban South Africa. Members of CAERS have also been appointed to local, provincial and national advisory bodies and committees.

CAERS has also provided workshops and training on racism and hate crime to Corrections Canada, the BC Teachers Federation and many municipal and community groups throughout Canada.

CAERS was also invited to address the House of Commons legislative committee on proposed legislation to create the Canadian Race Relations Foundation (CRRF) as part of a reparations settlement for the internment of Japanese-Canadian during World War II. In 2017, CAERS was invited to address the federal government's work on Islamophobia.

Based on the recommendations of the Racism, Hate Crime and the Law conference held in Vancouver, British Columbia and the report prepared for the Department of Justice, CAERS met with the Attorney General of BC to establish a dedicated policing unit focusing on hate crime. The first hate crime unit in Canada was soon formed with representation from various police forces in the province and the Community Liaison Branch of the Ministry of the Attorney General.

CAERS also received support from the National Film Board of Canada, the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Province of British Columbia and Knowledge Network to interview leaders and present and former members of racist groups to produce educational resources on the recruitment and recovery of youth from racist groups. Video-taped interviews were conducted with Ernst Zundel, Charles Scott, Christopher Brodsky, Dan Sims, Kerry Noble, and Johnny Lee Carey.

Following a number of incidents in Correctional facilities in 1998, CAERS was tasked by Corrections Canada to develop a manual on racist symbols, to develop educational materials for Corrections staff, to deliver workshop for staff and to hold meetings with inmates on issues related to racism within Corrections.

Recognition and support for the work of CAERS can be viewed here ...(link)